THE GREEN POWER

Robert GREEN tell us about his approach and passion for cricket since the very beginning in Salisbury, Wiltshire.



" I just remember sitting in the classroom watching the sport taking place on the playing fields, instead of concentrating on my lessons. "


Rob, can you tell us a little bit about your first approach to the sport and cricket?


Cricket has been my main sporting passion for the last 45 years. But as a young boy any sport with a ball involved suited me.


As my years progressed cricket definitely became my first choice sport, there is so much strategy and tactical decisions to be made by the captains. As a young man I didn't appreciate it at all, that's come with age, especially in test match cricket, where the matches can last up to five days. I am sure my passion for sport as a boy affected my schooling, I just remember sitting in the classroom watching the sport taking place on the playing fields, instead of concentrating on my lessons. 


At what age did you start playing and what are your first memories of this sport?


I would have been no more than 8-years old, when I first played cricket. One of my earliest memories of cricket was watching it on TV on a Sunday afternoon with my father and driving past the village green and seeing all these men standing around and wearing all white clothes. But my favourite, playing cricket in my back garden with my father, mother, two sisters and our dog (retrieving the ball) . Very beautiful memories. 




How long have you been practising cricket for?

I played cricket for approximately 27 years, I stopped playing when I was 35 years old due to an ongoing knee injury. A very sad time. Too young to have to stop doing something that you love.


My approach to cricket has definitely changed over time. When I was a young player I wasn't aware of all the tactics involved, I just wanted to bowl the ball as quickly as I could and get the batsmen out or at-least intimidate them, thankfully what's come with age is a better understanding of the game of cricket, I love the game more each year, you never stop learning. 

"It Is quite an eccentric sport played by some very eccentric characters.Unfortunately cricket is not being played as much anymore in our state schools, which does concern me greatly"

It sounds as if cricket, as sport in general, taught you how to face life and its difficulties as well. What are the peculiar rules to cricket?


With regards to the peculiarities of cricket, they are endless, there are so many quirky rules and names for fielding positions, I really don't know where to start or how to explain them. Cricket is not played in the rain, the players will leave the field of play when it rains and wait in the changing rooms until it stops, then the play will resume.


It is quite an eccentric sport played by some very eccentric characters. It is inherent that cricket maintains its popularity, its our national summer sport. Unfortunately cricket is not being played as much anymore in our state schools, which does concern me greatly, but our grounds for international matches are very often sold out, which is encouraging.






What did you learn from cricket?


Sportsmanship and discipline is the greatest gift I've taken from cricket, unlike in rugby union you don't question the referee or umpires in cricket, over decisions. The importance of being part of a team, again this is something I have appreciated more with age, the value of people/friends I met while playing.

I moved away from Brighton 15 years ago, and am still in contact with and meet occasionally and reminisce about the good old days. 

What do you think are main differences between cricket and other sports (in terms of value, attention, effort & team spirit etc.) ?

Test match cricket is played over five days, so discipline is an absolute must. As far as I'm aware there aren't that many team sports that last that long. Watching the captains decisions/tactics over the 5 days is interesting as opposed to 90 minutes of sport, again team/dressing room spirit is absolutely essential for moral. Cricket is not loved by all though, many people find it slow and boring and it is considered a middle class sport. Over a 5-day test match the captains handling of his players is vitally important, keeping spirits high when you find yourself fielding for two days in the heat and sun, is quite challenging. 


Sportsmanship and discipline is the greatest gift I've taken from cricket.



What is your biggest regret about cricket and best memories?


​My biggest regret in cricket was having a serious knee injury when I was 19 years old, I obviously played again, but not to the same level, but out of the bad came some good, when I moved to Brighton I joined a local cricket team.

Dome Mission Cricket Club, I  was very very lucky, the most brilliant team of players I have ever played with, the diversity of the players and an amazing captain made for 8 years of unforgettable cricket and our night outs after the game finished. I have nothing but beautiful memories of this time of my life.

Other beautiful memories I have are of myself and my father going to watch our first professional match together. Also with village cricket you often find yourself playing on a beautiful village green, where the wives, girlfriends and children can watch while eating a picnic and enjoying a glass of wine!!


What a great way to spend a lazy summer afternoon. 






Who were your heroes in cricket?


I have two childhood hero's.


The now Sir Ian Botham, England, brilliant all-rounder ie. could bat, bowl  and brilliant catcher of the ball, the second is Sir Vivian Richards, Antigua, West Indies, the most devastating batsman I have ever watched and brilliant in the field.


Both these players dominated international cricket in the 1980s. England is actually the world champions at the moment, they beat New Zealand in a brilliant final in 2019.


India though is currently ranked the top side in the world for test match cricket.






What does “dare” mean to you ?


To move beyond my subconsciously self imposed restrictions/barriers and past my comfort zone, to achieve my inward ambitions. Before it's too late!!

I mentioned my two childhood hero's before, but looking back at my time with Dome Mission Cricket Club in Brighton my captain was a real hero, the time, effort, organising he selflessly gave to keep the club and our friendships afloat, was priceless. His name, Richard Rigg.


To move beyond my subconsciously self imposed restrictions/barriers and past my comfort zone, to achieve my inward ambitions. Before it's too late!!





Interview and Article by

Riccardo Aimerito

Photos by

Rob Green

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